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11 may 2012 - Aupaluk, Nunavik, Canada. Inuit hunters gather on the shore of the iceshelf, getting ready for a community hunt. Inuit consume a diet of foods that are fished, hunted, and gathered locally. This may include walrus, Ringed Seal, Bearded Seal, beluga whale, caribou, polar bear, muskoxen, birds (including their eggs) and fish. While it is not possible to cultivate plants for food in the Arctic the Inuit have traditionally gathered those that are naturally available. Grasses, tubers, roots, stems, berries, fireweed and seaweed (kuanniq or edible seaweed) were collected and preserved depending on the season and the location. According to Edmund Searles in his article "Food and the Making of Modern Inuit Identities," they consume this type of diet because a mostly meat diet is "effective in keeping the body warm, making the body strong, keeping the body fit, and even making that body healthy".

The decline of hunting is partially due to the fact that young people lack the skills to survive off the land. They are no longer skilled in hunting like their ancestors and are growing more accustomed to the Qallunaat ("White people") food that they receive from the south. The high costs of hunting equipment—snowmobiles, rifles, sleds, camping gear, gasoline, and oil—is also causing a decline in families who hunt for their meals.

But the biggest threat to the Inuit culture could be climate change. Some Inuit believe climate change could bring about a "cultural genocide" as their hunting way of life melts with the sea ice. With climate change, the physical basis for Inuit culture will disappear. "They won't be able to practise a hunting culture at all" says Franklyn Griffiths, an arctic expert.
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© 2014 Marc-Andre Pauze - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
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11 may 2012 - Aupaluk, Nunavik, Canada. Inuit hunters gather on the shore of the iceshelf, getting ready for a community hunt. Inuit consume a diet of foods that are fished, hunted, and gathered locally. This may include walrus, Ringed Seal, Bearded Seal, beluga whale, caribou, polar bear, muskoxen, birds (including their eggs) and fish. While it is not possible to cultivate plants for food in the Arctic the Inuit have traditionally gathered those that are naturally available. Grasses, tubers, roots, stems, berries, fireweed and seaweed (kuanniq or edible seaweed) were collected and preserved depending on the season and the location. According to Edmund Searles in his article "Food and the Making of Modern Inuit Identities," they consume this type of diet because a mostly meat diet is "effective in keeping the body warm, making the body strong, keeping the body fit, and even making that body healthy". <br />
<br />
The decline of hunting is partially due to the fact that young people lack the skills to survive off the land. They are no longer skilled in hunting like their ancestors and are growing more accustomed to the Qallunaat ("White people") food that they receive from the south. The high costs of hunting equipment—snowmobiles, rifles, sleds, camping gear, gasoline, and oil—is also causing a decline in families who hunt for their meals.<br />
<br />
But the biggest threat to the Inuit culture could be climate change. Some Inuit believe climate change could bring about a "cultural genocide" as their hunting way of life melts with the sea ice. With climate change, the physical basis for Inuit culture will disappear. "They won't be able to practise a hunting culture at all" says Franklyn Griffiths, an arctic expert.